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John grew up in the small Northern Alabama town of Dogtown. He began to show his musical initiative as he began to learn the guitar at the tender age of 6. John also learned to play the bass, drums, harmonica and piano. He directed his sights toward becoming a singer/songwriter in Nashville. As many tuneful youth do, though, John’s dreams began to turn toward Music City. However, circumstances and Divine providence began to take John’s life in a different direction. John enlisted in the Delay Entry Program of the United States Army at 17 . When he graduated from high school he went straight to boot camp. Not your typical graduation present by any means. What’s more, four days out of boot camp John was shipped off to serve his country. John fought in Desert Shield and Desert Storm where he served eight years as a Gunner on an M-1 Tank. He was labeled a “top gun.” John married at 24 and he was discharged from the U.S. Army at 25. He and his wife had a son during this time as well He says, . “I never thought I’d spend eight years of my life in the service. It’s just the way it went. But, my time in the service enabled me to become a stronger individual and, believe it or not, it actually prepared me for the music business.”

John also thinks this training and discipline gave him a great foundation for working in the music business. He says, “When you enter the military, it’s their job to break you down and then build you back up again; reshaping you both physically and mentally. Much like the music business,” he adds in just under his breath. “I learned a lot about myself and what I am capable of. So, today, every negative strengthens my resolve to get through it and if you tell me I can’t do something, I’ll show you ten different ways that I can.”

After hitting the industry hard in 2003, John’s made it a point to keep up the pressure on his work so he can grow and be a better artist. He says, “Music is everything I do. I listen to the radio all of the time. I have tons of instruments at home]. I like to go see live shows and I’m a student at every performance that I attend whether it be a seasoned professional or an amateur. Life without music would make for an unfulfilling life!”

John adds, ““I don’t know if I’ll ever be a huge superstar, but I do know that I just want the chance to put my music out there–music that touches people and evokes emotion (reminiscent, happy or sad). I just want the opportunity to get my music to the country music listeners to let them decide my destiny. If they say ‘yeah,’ or if they say ‘neigh,’ I can live with that. Because it will be the fans the decision about my music and career, not the record industry.”

Find out more about John Stone at http://www.johnwesleystone.com/

or his MySpace at http://www.myspace.com/johnstonecountry

Most people will tell you the quickest way to your goal is a straight line. It might be the quickest but you might not learn anything if you don’t get the chance to experience. Tootsie’s Recording artist John Stone is a musical machine because he’s taken the time to learn from the good and the not so good experiences in his life.