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The fertile rural country of the Bluegrass State has given the rest of us some fantastic contributions to the entertainment industry. Soon to be included in this group that includes the Judds, Loretta Lynn and Dwight Yoakum could be Kristi Miller. Kristi’s story almost starts out like a musical movie of the week. She grew up in Eastern Kentucky just a stone’s throw away from U.S. 23, otherwise known as the Country Music Highway. Her mom sang in church, giving Kristi a sound foundation in the fundamentals of music and life. Her father was a songwriter who also collected and sold records. Her father was the one who encouraged her to try putting music to her original poetry, She says, “Then he’d say, ‘record that tune. Don’t go to sleep. Don’t lollygag. Record it and go back to it to see how to make it better.’”Kristi did this but still took other work to finance her music career. She worked clean up in a local tool and die factory when she was 14. But she did take a break to occasionally belt out Bonnie Tyler’s song, “It’s A Heartache”, her favorite song at the time. It was Dolly Parton, though who really caught her attention as she developed her performing style.

Just as Kristi seemed to have her career going in the right direction her mother, suffering from Chrohn’s Disease, died. Kristi says her mother left her with many important lessons. “She was so strong willed, through pain and terrible circumstances. She said if you want something go after it. If there’s any possible way to reach within and find the strength to press, press. Because it’s worth it.”

Kristi’s family built a Christian magazine called ‘The Seeker’. After Kristi’s mother passed away Kristi decided she would take a more prominent role in the management of this publication. She did everything from ad sales to writing to driving the two day route to get her magazine out to gas stations, restaurants, hotels and grocery stores. At the same time, though, this blonde dynamo hit the stage any time she got the chance. Gary McSpadden, former Oak Ridge Boy, spotted Kristi during one of these appearances at the Pigeon Forge Tennessee Memories Theater. Gary cast Kristi in several variety shows. On top of that Kristi recorded commercial customs for Clear Channel radio. Kristi began to visit Nashville during this time when she had the chance.

Kristi’s father has continuously supported her songwriting and performing. She says, “It really helped me a lot that he was honest with me and didn’t flatter me when I really needed improving.”

In her opinion her best song to date is called Wild Rose. She says, “I relate to it when I was 16 when I was having to go through my mom being in the hospital and when I was 20 taking on a business, sink or swim. There was a strength that rose up inside of me that said you have to survive. You’re on your own. The wild rose is soft and delicate but year after year, after blizzards she fades for a while but she comes right back.”

Find out more about Kristi through her website at: http://www.kristimiller.net
or her MySpace site at: http://www.myspace.com/kristimillermusic

The fertile rural country of the Bluegrass State has given the rest of us some fantastic contributions to the entertainment industry. Soon to be included in this group that includes the Judds, Loretta Lynn and Dwight Yoakum could be Kristi Miller. Kristi’s story almost starts out like a musical movie of the week. She grew up in Eastern Kentucky just a stone’s throw away from U.S. 23, otherwise known as the Country Music Highway. Her mom sang in church, giving Kristi a sound foundation in the fundamentals of music and life. Her father was a songwriter who also collected and sold records. Her father was the one who encouraged her to try putting music to her original poetry, She says, “Then he’d say, ‘record that tune. Don’t go to sleep. Don’t lollygag. Record it and go back to it to see how to make it better.’”